Association for publishing music for the guitar
Association for publishing music for the guitar
Cart 0

Interview 4 – Colette Mourey

Andrew Williams Colette Mourey Interview Mourey

Introduction

Colette Mourey

Colette Mourey was one of the first composers published by Bergmann Edition.  She is a concert guitarist, a prolific composer with over 1000 published works, an arranger, a highly respected academic musicologist with many research and teaching publications to her name.   She is also the author of eight published novels.  There is a lot more information in her Wikipedia entry https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colette_Mourey ; and a selection of compositions for guitar and many ensembles can be found on her YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/keni71240 .  The selection of Colette’s works published by Bergmann Edition can be found at https://bergmann-edition.com/collections/mourey-colette

I sent Colette my interview questions in English, and she replied to them in her native French on the understanding that I would produce a translation.  The following is my translation (which Colette has approved).  If you would prefer to read Colette’s responses in her elegant French prose, please click this link to see the French version.

Start with ‘hypertonality’.  I have read the explanation on your Wikipedia entry, but I confess I don’t really understand.  Is there a way to explain it in lay terms?

Hypertonality derives from atonal counterpoint as it was taught by Julien Falk (https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julien_Falk ). However, while it is still a ‘counterpoint’ (a juxtaposition of melodic lines as opposed to ‘harmony’ or ‘chords’), what distinguishes hypertonality from atonal counterpoint is that in hypertonality, the polyphonic language is ‘functional’ (however contradictory that might sound) and is rendered consonant rather than dissonant.  Dissonance is not entirely excluded, nor are other sonic artefacts such as noise; but my reworking of the principles is around ‘natural consonances’ in ‘simple’ acoustic relationships, especially the fourth interval and the ‘Bartok chord’.

The critical distinguishing feature of hypertonality is its use of spiral scales.  A conventional tonal scale repeats the same selection of notes when extended into higher or lower registers - for example the major scale uses the same range from tonic to leading note, whatever octave it is played in. In a hypertonal ‘spiral’ scale, in ranges greater than an octave, each register may contain a different selection of notes.  I believe the ‘spiral’ is a superior form, better adapted to comprehend all forms occurring in life and nature and to give them artistic expression. Our conventional modes, which have persisted far too long, have led to a stagnation of ideas.

These days, a great number of my compositions are strictly hypertonal.   However, when I worked for publishing houses and was teaching at the same time, I would just as readily have said ‘modal’ as ‘tonal’, ‘atonal’, ‘hypertonal’, ‘Western’, ‘non-Western’, ‘popular’ or ‘serious’… in the end, I developed a synthesis which probably represents my own personal style (although that is a continual evolution, and I continue to search intensely….)

You are an academic musicologist and author on musical theory and pedagogy.  How does this affect your composing?  Is it possible to say what proportion is ‘head’ and what proportion is ‘heart’?

I wrote a work on Thought (« De l’Analogie aux Métalogiques – Les Déterminants de l’Isomorphisme Universel »  https://www.occitanie-tribune.com/articles/31097/actus-litteraires-de-l-analogie-aux-metalogiques-de-colette-mourey-une-passionnante-exploration-des-determinants-de-l-isomorphisme-universel ;   https://www.decitre.fr/livres/de-l-analogie-aux-metalogiques-9791035913588.html) showing the degree to which our thought, even our so-called logic, is heavily reliant on analogy. This imposes limitations on us, unless we can open our minds to more complex logics such as the quadrilemma [interviewer’s note – a quadrilemma is a circumstance where a choice must be made between four options that seem equally undesirable].

In fact, this summarises our task as composers – we write our music deploying, at the same time, a discursive logic; a system of analogy (in terms of musical intent and musical form); and a multi-dimensional problem-solving approach.   At every step, musical composition demonstrably involves every dimension of human thought!

To search, to teach, to invent: these are all one and the same thing.  Every aspect of our overall journey nourishes another. Progress in any one area provides us with progress in all the others, and the tiniest discovery can lead to a general leap forward.

Indeed, for my students, I wrote short practical treatises on counterpoint, harmony and orchestration, published by Éditions Reift : 

https://www.all-sheetmusic.com/Books-about-Music/Du-Contrepoint-au-Contrepoint-Atonal-Standard.html

https://www.musicshopeurope.com/fr-fr/product/emr18666/introduction-%C3%A0-l-harmonie-et-%C3%A0-l-orchestration.aspx

https://www.musicshopeurope.com/fr-fr/product/emr18665/introduction-au-contrepoint.aspx

These were above all written to facilitate their creativity! To set them free!

The head and the heart are intimately linked.  There are powerful connections that link the heart and head. The heart is the seat of ancestral memory (‘species memory’) and communicates emotion and feeling.  There is no mind without a heart – our feelings build our deepest mental foundations.  And there is no heart without a mind – we have a need to reason.  I have written a brief monograph on the subject

https://www.bookelis.com/developpement-personnel/35235-Nous-Sommes-non-pas-Tri-Mais-Quadripartites-.html

https://www.amazon.fr/Nous-Sommes-non-Mais-Quadripartites/dp/2900720087

Thought derives not only from the alliance between our hearts and our minds, but in fact comes from our entire organism: a “holos” which manifests as the ephemeral formation of a more fundamental “idea” – simultaneously immanent and transcendent.

Do you receive commissions? If so, what is your approach to writing a commissioned work?

Because I am a civil servant and an educator, I have always responded gratis to requests made to me by musicians (including the regional Conservatoire, or children’s choirs….)

There are also commissions from the publishing houses that sell my works.  They tend to fall within the broad ambit of ‘research’, which drives every academic (although they go a little wider than this, because they also involve ‘creation’), and so I count them under that heading, as part of my continuous professional development.

Quite frankly, it would have driven me crazy to work as a professor of composition (notably in counterpoint and interpretation of musical texts), and as music educationalist, without writing and creating music on my own account.

I was interested in your written introduction to your French Concerto (https://bergmann-edition.com/collections/mourey-colette/products/mourey-concerto-francais-pour-guitare-et-orchestre )

First, how did the work come about?

At the start, I had it in mind to feed into the long French guitar tradition.  It’s little known, unlike the excellent Spanish tradition: but the French conception of guitar music (for example from Robert de Visée to Alexandre Tansman and Maurice Ohana…) is rich and interesting.

Later, I realised that there are few concertos for guitar and full symphony orchestra – even if, straight away, Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez springs to mind!   Now, the guitar works well with a big orchestra, if one manages the timbres, dissociates the registers, and provides space for the entry points.  It is, even, the most beautiful instrument to associate with the orchestra! The most expressive!

Second, what elements would you say are specifically French? Is there a clearly identifiable French tradition in guitar music and how have you exemplified it?

The formal structures of French musical style have a tendency to manifest themselves very clearly.  Above all, there is a very linear discursiveness about French music. If one compares the verbs ‘to resound’ and ‘to reason’, French music is more ‘reasoning’ than ‘resounding’ (coming as it does from a very Cartesian civilisation!).

Of course, instead of allowing myself to be constrained by our inherited logical ‘either/or’ dualities, I introduced a quadrivalent logic, underpinned by an element of hypertonality (in this case, quite broadly applied).

Third, have you heard it played?

For the moment, the health situation is hardly propitious for big orchestras!  I have heard my Concerto on  guitar, in snippets, during the course of working on it….we will have to wait for Covid19 to go away!

You arrange piano or orchestral works for classical guitar and they seem to be a very eclectic mix. How do you choose a piece to arrange?

I am both pianist and guitarist: having started, very young, on piano, I chose the guitar after hearing a magnificent recital by Maestro Oscar Cacérès, in Paris.  I went on to practice, perform and educate using both instruments.   From the outset of my guitar studies, at the same time as discovering a splendid and under-recognised repertoire, I missed a certain number of great composers, such as Beethoven, Mozart, Shubert, Schumann and Chopin, whose works I had played on piano.  That is why I have arranged so many of their works (and those of others, such as Gershwin) for guitar – notably, in the collections  “Schubert pour guitare”, “Mozart pour guitare”, “Beethoven pour guitare”  https://www.bookelis.com/auteur/mourey-colette/17785; in the many arrangements for solo guitar and for chamber ensemble with guitar published by Éditions Reift; and especially in the very detailed transcriptions, with comprehensive guitar fingering, that I have provided to the excellent Bergmann Edition.

I love to transcribe for the guitarist these pieces I have performed as a pianist. Soon the opposite will also be true – I have the idea, for example, that the works of our vihuelists would sound beautiful on the harpsichord or piano….

When you compose for solo classical guitar, what is your approach?  Do you compose direct to the page, or using the guitar, or perhaps the keyboard? Describe the process a little – for example do you work quickly, slowly? Plan the whole piece out in advance or not? Do you start a piece knowing how it will sound, or is it a voyage of discovery?

When I compose for guitar, I try at all costs to avoid touching the instrument itself!  I find it essential to maintain a coherent musical discourse.  I notate, for example, what I hear in my head.  Afterwards, of course, the guitar being a demanding instrument, it is important to review and sift the music using the guitar – it would be a pity to encumber a piece with unnecessary difficulties!

Then there is a phase of back-and-forth between the musical conception and the instrumental realisation.  This process enriches the composition through a ‘feedback loop’.

I love writing the fingering during the final phase, which is the preparation of the score itself.  This allows me to ensure I am not unplayable!

In general my first vision of a piece is entire and intuitive – the work appears to me in its totality, like a flash!  The overall form of the piece is an emotion, an idea, a very strong feeling…   Then, it’s all long hard work, step by step, to re-attain the blinding light of the first vision.

In the specific case of the guitar, which is my professional instrument, I don’t have to ask myself how the piece should or shouldn’t sound – this is something all guitarists know instinctively!  For other instruments, it would take more work on my part.

And what about for a larger ensemble piece? For example, your French Concerto is for full modern symphony orchestra, which is a huge undertaking – do you use a midi/synthesiser package to work out the parts?

When I compose for a chamber ensemble or orchestra, to ‘hear’ the piece as the conductor would, I am lucky enough to have perfect pitch.  I work without the need for aural ‘playback’, usually from a sketch that I notate in the style of a ‘piano reduction’.  It is in any case, for everyone, fabulously enriching and interesting to cultivate one’s own ‘mental sound’ – it maintains a certain mental youth!

As well as finalising a conductor’s score, I always notate the individual parts myself.  Right from the start I have used the software I used with my musicology students: Sibelius.  I am less familiar with Finale, and I know that there are other highly capable software packages out there.

The advantage of having prepared all stages of the edition is the depth with which you can proof-read it.  It is the best way of avoiding errors!  Thus, as musicians we develop our visual faculties after using our aural faculties!

Do you often listen to music purely for pleasure (without analysis)?  In your current mood as you answer this question, what would you like to listen to?

Being in the countryside, I adore silence (and I feel a deep need for it).  Or rather, for the ‘silence of life’, interspersed with birdsong and animal sounds.  As a result, when I listen to music it is to composers who have inexhaustibly glorified life and nature: I love them all!

I never play music as background noise – I wouldn’t know how to do that!  I really listen! I immerse myself deeply in it! Or I listen to the silence…

Johann Sebastian Bach remains the ‘greatest of the great’.  He isn’t the only one, far from it: Messiaen, Ohana, Boulez, Berio…all provide many moments of ecstasy.  But independent of all emotion and whatever one’s state of mind, one can always listen to Johann Sebastian Bach and never tire of him.

Do you also listen to popular music/folk music/world music? If so what are your tastes in these?

I very much like all traditional music – its sincerity, in some cases its innocence.  I have worked with a lot of traditional forms, as much in arranging as in composing.  They are a stream whose life-force nourishes that which, with added layers of complexity, will become ‘serious’ music.

And I adore traditional music from all over the world.  My Moroccan birth made it easier for me by making me rub shoulders, from the start, with different currents in music.

Even if the oral traditions of folk music are somewhat repetitive, there are strong and honest rhythms, forceful melodic lines, and plenty of surprises in the phrasing – it is a resource one can mine freely.

Do you often return to your own compositions later, and re-listen to them or revise them?

I certainly go back to my compositions and revisit them, although I don’t do so very often because I work so much on them at the time of composing.

I have done so, in particular, for my pedagogical works – in which I try continuously to improve the progressions and the stylistic diversity. 

For my ‘strict’ works I think that as they appear in publication, so they will stay!  It is very difficult to modify a completed structure without rendering it unstable: at that point, it would become a completely different piece!

If you were to choose one of your pieces to introduce a guitarist to your work, which one? And why?

This is a difficult question because I have always written music with the utmost sincerity, and because there are several distinct periods in my work – I don’t know that there is a single work that represents them all.

To give the player insight into ‘hypertonality’, I would suggest ‘Abacus’ (Éditions Reift); ‘Tant l’Or des Nuits’ and the ‘Concerto Français’ (more modal and tonal) (Bergmann Edition); and the ‘Quasi Sonata’ (Éditions Soldano).  But there are others…

Does your music have different audiences? For example, are your solo guitar pieces aimed at the same listener as, say, the Four Bagatelles (which I’m listening to as I write these questions - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWGMQZafZmc )?

As in literature, in music “through effort comes joy” (as Beethoven put it so well).   Serious music, like great literature, is aimed at everyone – even if listening to it demands some reflection and concentration!

Personally, I like to blend a little of the popular spirit with a more complex musical language: this touches every part of the soul and the personality, while having something to interest all listeners.

When I started on my development of hypertonality, I did so out of a profound desire to bring serious contemporary music to a wider public.

It is also clear to me that if works are well presented, they can be accessible to the whole world.  There is certainly still a lot to do by way of cultural mediation to make this happen.

Can you pinpoint your main motivation in composing – for example, to delight or entertain? To work out a musical problem or theory? To express something personal?

A difficult question!  I was less than four years old when I first knew I would be a writer, and that I would write something other than the books I saw in front of me.  At that point, I didn’t even know what a musical score was…

I believe that every human being comes into the world with a mission and that the essential thing in life is to fulfil that mission.

I could put it another way: despite the many other obligations of life, such as work and family, I know that my whole existence is about music.  Thus I ‘seek’ (there is still so much to discover in music), and I ‘feel’, essentially through music.

You are often described as a very accomplished guitarist: do you perform in concert? If so, do you include your own compositions in your concert programmes?

I started out as a guitar teacher and performer, and gave many concerts.  Then, events decided otherwise. At that time, there were no jobs for a guitarist in the region where I’ve lived since my marriage; and I had a herniated disc in my back that kept nagging me…   So, I was obliged to go more deeply into my study of music theory, re-apply myself seriously to the piano (which I’d let slip a little) and become a choirmaster[1].  Which only goes to show that life knows very well how to put ‘coincidences’ in your path that lead you where it wants you to go!  I was headed for a career teaching and playing the guitar…and then, suddenly, I had penetrated more deeply into the universe of music – singing, teaching music and musicology, composing for voice and multiple instruments.

Do you make recordings of your compositions and arrangements?  Are they available to listen to?

Many musicians work on my guitar compositions (and still work with me ‘virtually’). 

I don’t allow myself to perform publicly since composition takes up most of my day.  I have a habit of playing guitar a lot as I work…in the end, time gets away from me!

Having said that, I play all the pieces I write for guitar, for myself at home.

I can point you to several YouTube videos (this isn’t an exhaustive list):

There is also a CD  ‘Œuvres Hypertonales pour guitare’ https://play.anghami.com/song/40652809 

As an example of work for other instruments, you will find my quintet ‘La Maestra’ on a CD dedicated to contemporary female composers called ‘The Other Half of Music’ https://www.amazon.fr/Other-Half-Music-Colette-Mourey/dp/B07MWZ5NXX

Do you enjoy hearing your work performed by others?

It is always a magnificent discovery to listen to one’s work interpreted by an artist one doesn’t know.  In unexpected, original and personal ways, there arises between composer and performer a sort of uninterrupted dialogue.  The most interesting aspect is that what comes back to the composer is quite a different thing from what he or she originally ‘heard’.  Every time, the result is something of great beauty, and truly ‘well observed’! We must never forget that only through an abundant diversity of interpretative approaches can a work assume a life of its own (and not die, fixed and frozen).

Were you already composing before you started serious academic studies in music?  If so, did your work change as a result of your study?

I have always written music (although certainly very inexpertly in my childhood).  Of course, study of music is absolutely essential to anyone wishing to be a composer! We build on the foundations of a pre-existing culture…

And yet, I don’t think I have changed my own style as a result of the materials to which I have been introduced.  Theoretical study allows one, with validity, to justify one’s own musical language – to analyse it more deeply and to add to its complexities.  But one can always recognise the initial idea or style – an originating thought that is already established, and prefigures any scholarly overlay.

Does the work of other contemporary composers influence you?

I continue to marvel at Boulez, Berio, Aperghis, and many others…happily music is a living thing, continually transforming, evolving and taking on new and previously unknown colours.  Nothing in art is definitively fixed!

I don’t know if I can talk about direct influences; but every contact we keep up with other composers, every concert we attend, helps us to enrich our own style, gives us new ideas, pushes us to develop ourselves further…

Would you say you are, or have been, part of any particular movement in music?

Fundamentally, I have never been part of any established musical movement. I have simply invented and tried to develop my own system, ‘hypertonality’ – which will be taken up by others after me, and transformed in different ways…

Is there any performer you would particularly wish to write a piece of music for?

I have written for many guitarists and I will always be delighted to write for anyone who takes an interest in hypertonality and wants to discover its possibilities through a new piece.  That is something I would do willingly without financial consideration, to make the concept accessible to the wider world. 

Indeed, I dream of writing for certain great players for whom I have not yet written anything...it will happen!

I’ve mentioned the amazing amount and variety of work you do – teaching, academic writing, composition and creative writing.  I see that your novels have all been published fairly recently, and in a very short space of time. Currently, which of these activities is your main focus? And which would be the last of these you could possibly give up?

Most of my publications (music and fiction) have been since I brought up my children - to which task, in the normal course of things, I dedicated about twenty years of my life.  I had been waiting to rediscover a little freedom!  Now, since I have retired, I can give myself completely to my work.

Having said that, for the most part all this work has been developing in me throughout my years of professional and family obligations, just waiting for the day when I have time to finish things.  That day has now arrived.

I am certainly, by profession, “composer and guitarist”.  My literary essays bear witness to a philosophy that I hold at heart.  I also illustrate that philosophy through my novels (in an easier-to-read form).  At bottom, all of this constitutes one single endeavour, which wears different guises. From a professional point of view, I lay a firm claim only on the musical aspect!

Do you see a connection between your fiction writing and music composition?

Music is a little like a philosophy without words.  It addresses itself direct to the soul.  In the final analysis it is music that is the true philosophy of life!  And yet a composer can navigate easily between the musical ‘motif’ and the literary ‘mot’; and can combine the two, as in a vocal work.  There is not really a clear-cut separation!

What are you working on musically at the moment?

At the moment I am putting the finishing touches to my ‘Etudes Progressives’ for guitar, which will be going to Bergmann Edition.  At the same time, I am finishing off ‘Cube’ for piano – a series of pieces, of which some have already been published, dealing with the Platonic solids.  And I am working on my symphony ‘L’Univers’; on several concertos; and on a trio called ‘des Algorithmes’.  All these works end up interacting with each other – and all of them with my literary writing, and vice versa.  This (I hope!) prevents me becoming too ‘instrumentist’ rather than ‘musician’, and thus I maintain a broader vision.

How has your working life been affected by the pandemic? And how, if at all, has it affected your composing?

From the start of this tragic pandemic, we live like everyone else more or less like recluses.  Having said that, solitude proves to be very conducive to composing.  Quite unexpectedly I have found myself with time to write, particularly for orchestra – and generally longer and more complex pieces.

Perhaps we are all living through a fruitful period of introspection,  from which let us hope humanity will emerge more humane and ecologically responsible.

You live and work in a beautiful part of France – do you feel your surroundings influence your music?

Nature is the greatest of teachers! I had the unforeseen good fortune to live in the countryside, and I would not give it up for the world!  When all else seems to let you down, you listen to the birds, and life whispers to you never to let yourself be discouraged. 

Do you have one burning ambition, in terms of composing music (that is, to compose a particular thing)?

I have written cantatas for choir and orchestra and a ballet (published by Éditions Reift), but I hope to go on to opera or operetta – the latter would certainly include the guitar.  Why not based on something like my recently-published comedy ‘Tout l’Or du Ciel’ https://www.amazon.com/Tout-lOr-Ciel-Com%C3%A9die-French/dp/B094TG1SY5/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

I also hope to continue writing for children’s choir: vocal polyphony develops the intelligence so much – one can never have enough of it!  Furthermore, combining traditional folk music with serious music allows us to develop an educational tool without equal!

And I still have many ideas for guitar and piano music that I hope to bring to fruition.

Has any teacher, mentor or musical collaborator specially influenced the direction your music has taken?  If so, who and how?

In general, publishers are a great help in developing the thinking of their composers.  For my own part, this was particularly true of the publisher and orchestral conductor Marc Reift.  The composer remains himself or herself, of course – much to the publisher’s chagrin – but, through reading and re-reading will end up by deepening her own thinking.

Apart from that, I love serious music in its widest sense – all composers…and I listen to so many.  Which leads me to say that it is this great tide of thought that has educated and enlightened me, rather than any one individual.

You were born in Morocco – do you think you absorbed any of its musical influences?

Clearly, being the child of music-loving parents who were deeply attached to ‘great music’, and being born in Morocco (where I spent my early childhood), I could only be polycultural and bicontinental right from the start!  Notably from the point of view of musical scales…

I have a homeland ‘of the heart’ in addition to my actual homeland.  Generally, I have combined the two…

Am I wrong in seeing an influence of spirituality or even mysticism in some of your musical output?

I am certainly a mystic by nature.  Essentially, anyway, every human being is in his or her own way a mystic!  We can all very clearly perceive the powerful beam of white light that connects us, in an entirely personal way personally, to our Higher Being ...

But that aside, it is always a pity to fix too firmly on a dogma – we have everything to lose by it!

In fact everything, from the microcosm to the macrocosm, arranges itself in a wonderful architecture resembling a ‘loving intelligence’ or an ‘impersonal multiversal consciousness’, reflected in everything from the smallest atom to the greatest galaxy.   A ‘God’, simultaneously present in all and transcending all, manifest at all times everywhere….

Technology – how do you use it in your music?

Even though I have used synthesisers a couple of times, I greatly prefer human sounds: the artist is always more intelligent, and shows much better taste, than a machine!

I remember particularly having married the sound of the guitar with synthesised sounds: that seems possible to me, since the guitar is a rich, emotional and expressive instrument.  But to provide its accompaniment I would far, far prefer an orchestra of flesh and bone!

 

The original French version

Let’s start with ‘hypertonality’. I have read the explanation on your Wikipedia entry, but I confess I don’t really understand.  Is there a way to explain it in lay terms?

L’hypertonalité dérive du contrepoint atonal (tel que l’enseignait Julien Falk https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julien_Falk).

Cependant, tout en restant un « contrepoint » (une « polymélodie » – non une « harmonie » ou des « accords »), à la différence dudit contrepoint atonal, c’est un langage polyphonique rendu « fonctionnel » (un contrepoint « fonctionnel » - ce qui pourrait sembler antinomique) et redevenu « consonnant » (de fait, sans exclure la dissonance ou aucun matériau sonore dont le bruit, j’aurai retravaillé autour des « consonances naturelles » - en rapports acoustiques « simples » ; particulièrement la quarte – et l’accord de Bartok).

Cela dit, ce qui fait la véritable spécificité de l’hypertonalité, ce sont les échelles spiralées : en ambitus supérieur à l’octave, elles offrent, dans chaque registre, un contenu différent. Je crois la « spirale » bien supérieure et bien mieux adaptée à retraduire toute forme de Vie – dont son expression artistique, que ce « cycle » qui aura trop longtemps perduré, nous cantonnant dans l’immobilisme idéique.

Dans les faits, un grand nombre de mes compositions sont strictement hypertonales.

 Cependant, comme je travaillais pour des Maisons d’Éditions et que j’étais parallèlement professeur, j’aurai écrit autant « modal » que « tonal », « atonal » et « hypertonal », « occidental » et « extra-occidental », « populaire » et « savant », … finissant par opérer une synthèse qui correspond, probablement, à mon style personnel (en perpétuelle évolution, je continue à chercher intensément …).

You are an academic musicologist and author on musical theory and pedagogy. How does this affect your composing?  Is it possible to say what proportion is ‘head’ and what proportion is ‘heart’?

J’ai écrit un Ouvrage sur la Pensée (« De l’Analogie aux Métalogiques – Les Déterminants de l’Isomorphisme Universel »  https://www.occitanie-tribune.com/articles/31097/actus-litteraires-de-l-analogie-aux-metalogiques-de-colette-mourey-une-passionnante-exploration-des-determinants-de-l-isomorphisme-universel ;   https://www.decitre.fr/livres/de-l-analogie-aux-metalogiques-9791035913588.html) montrant à quel point notre Pensée, même soi-disant « logique », était empreinte d’analogie et ne restait fructueuse que si elle s’ouvrait aux logiques plurivalentes (le quadrilemme par exemple).

En fait, cela résume notre action de compositeurs : on écrit, en musique, concomitamment de façon logique (discursive) et analogique (sous l’angle motivique et formel) tout en prenant en compte, très largement, des démarches quadrivalentes.

La composition musicale résume, pas à pas, pleinement ! l’ensemble des dimensions de la Pensée humaine !

« Chercher », « enseigner » et « inventer » sont une seule et même démarche. Chaque aspect de ce cheminement global en alimente un autre, un enrichissement particulier correspond à un progrès sous tous les angles, la moindre trouvaille permet un rebondissement général.

Effectivement, pour mes étudiants, j’aurai écrit de courts traités pratiques, de Contrepoint, d’Harmonie et d’Orchestration, parus aux Éditions Reift : 

https://www.all-sheetmusic.com/Books-about-Music/Du-Contrepoint-au-Contrepoint-Atonal-Standard.html

https://www.musicshopeurope.com/fr-fr/product/emr18666/introduction-%C3%A0-l-harmonie-et-%C3%A0-l-orchestration.aspx

https://www.musicshopeurope.com/fr-fr/product/emr18665/introduction-au-contrepoint.aspx

C’était surtout pour faciliter leur créativité ! Leur rendre de la liberté !

Tête et cœur s’avèrent intimement liés – de puissantes connexions unissent notre cœur et notre cerveau, le cœur restant le siège d’une Mémoire ancestrale (voire « d’espèce ») tout en relayant émotions et sentiments. Pas de cerveau sans cœur – nos ressentis bâtissent nos plus intimes fondements ! Ni de cœur sans cerveau – nous éprouvons le besoin de raisonner ! J’ai écrit un opuscule sur le sujet (très résumé) :

https://www.bookelis.com/developpement-personnel/35235-Nous-Sommes-non-pas-Tri-Mais-Quadripartites-.html

https://www.amazon.fr/Nous-Sommes-non-Mais-Quadripartites/dp/2900720087

La Pensée découle non seulement de l’alliance entre notre cœur et notre cerveau mais, en fait, elle provient de tout notre organisme : un « holos », qui se manifeste comme l’éphémère concrétisation d’une plus fondamentale « Idée » - simultanément immanente et transcendante à lui.

Do you receive commissions? If so, what is your approach to writing a commissioned work?

Comme je suis fonctionnaire – et enseignante, j’ai toujours répondu gratuitement aux commandes que les interprètes me faisaient (dont le Conservatoire de ma Région, ou des chœurs d’enfants,  …).

Restent les commissions en provenance des Maisons d’Éditions qui vendent mes ouvrages. Elles correspondent au grand axe de la « recherche » que mène tout professeur (même si c’est un peu plus large, puisqu’elles se réfèrent aussi à de la « création »), et c’est sous cet angle que je les déclare - c’est une continuité professionnelle !

Très franchement, cela m’aurait affolée d’être professeur en écriture musicale (notamment en contrepoint et traitement de texte musical) et en pédagogie musicale, sans, personnellement, « écrire » et « produire » !

 I was interested in your written introduction to your French Concerto (https://bergmann-edition.com/collections/mourey-colette/products/mourey-concerto-francais-pour-guitare-et-orchestre )

First, how did the work come about?

Au départ, j’avais dans l’idée de nourrir une longue tradition française guitaristique – peu souvent connue, contrairement à l’excellente tradition hispanique. Mais la conception française de la guitare (par exemple, de Robert de Visée à Alexandre Tansman et Maurice Ohana …) est riche et intéressante !

Ensuite, il m’est apparu qu’il existe encore peu de Concertos pour guitare et grand orchestre symphonique – même si, immédiatement, le Concerto d’Aranjuez de Joaquin Rodrigo nous vient à l’esprit ! Or, la guitare supporte très bien le grand orchestre, si l’on gère les timbres, si l’on dissocie les registres, si l’on dégage bien ses entrées … C’est, même, le plus bel instrument à associer à l’orchestre ! Le plus expressif !

Second, what elements would you say are specifically French? Is there a clearly identifiable French tradition in guitar music and how have you exemplified it?

Les structures formelles du style musical “français” ont tendance à apparaître très clairement et, surtout, la discursivité reste très linéaire.

Si l’on compare les verbes « résonner » et « raisonner », la musique française « raisonne » plus qu’elle ne « résonne » (provient d’une civilisation très cartésienne !).

Bien entendu, au lieu de me cantonner à l’ancestral dilemme, j’y aurai introduit une logique quadrivalente, sous-tendue par une relative hypertonalité (ici, assez large).    

Third, have you heard it played?

Pour l’instant, la situation sanitaire n’est guère propice aux grands orchestres !

J’ai entendu mon Concerto depuis la guitare, par bribes, en cours de travail …

Il faut attendre que le virus de la Covid19 s’éloigne !

You arrange piano or orchestral works for classical guitar and they seem to be a very eclectic mix. How do you choose a piece to arrange?

Je suis pianiste et guitariste : ayant commencé, très jeune, par le piano, j’aurai choisi la guitare après avoir écouté un magnifique récital du Maître Oscar Cacérès, à Paris ; puis, pratiqué, interprété et enseigné en me servant des deux instruments.

Lors de mes débuts en guitare, tout en découvrant un splendide répertoire pas assez connu, je regrettais un certain nombre de grands compositeurs comme Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert, Schumann, Chopin … que je jouais en piano.

C’est pourquoi j’ai beaucoup arrangé de leurs œuvres (et d’autres, dont Gerschwin) pour guitare – notamment, dans les recueils « Schubert pour guitare », « Mozart pour guitare », « Beethoven pour guitare » https://www.bookelis.com/auteur/mourey-colette/17785 ; dans les multiples arrangements pour guitare solo et musique de chambre avec guitare parus aux Éditions Reift et, surtout, dans les transcriptions très détaillées et doigtées que j’ai confiées aux excellentes Éditions Bergmann.

Souvent, ce sont les pièces que j’aurai eu l’occasion d’interpréter au piano que j’aime retranscrire pour les guitaristes.

L’inverse sera bientôt vrai : j’ai dans l’idée que nos vihuelistes, par exemple, sonneraient très bien au clavecin et au piano …

When you compose for solo classical guitar, what is your approach? Do you compose direct to the page, or using the guitar, or perhaps the keyboard? Describe the process a little – for example do you work quickly, slowly? Plan the whole piece out in advance or not? Do you start a piece knowing how it will sound, or is it a voyage of discovery?

Quand je compose pour guitare, j’essaie d’éviter à tout prix de toucher à l’instrument !

Je trouve fondamental d’entretenir un discours musical cohérent. Je note, donc, ce que j’entends mentalement.

Ensuite, bien évidemment, la guitare étant un instrument exigeant, il est très important que je repasse tout au crible, avec l’instrument : ce serait vraiment dommage de laisser d’inutiles difficultés !

Puis, ce sont des va-et-vient entre la conception et la réalisation instrumentale, qui s’alimentent mutuellement, en feed-back.

J’aime doigter, dans la phase terminale, la partition : ce qui me permet d’éviter d’être injouable !

En général, la première vision de la pièce est entière et intuitive : l’œuvre apparaît dans sa totalité, comme un flash !

La forme globale est un sentiment, une idée, une très forte sensation …

 Ensuite, c’est tout un très long travail, pas à pas, pour retrouver la lumière fulgurante de la première impression.

Pour le cas particulier de la guitare, qui est mon instrument professionnel, je n’ai pas à me demander comment cela va sonner ou non : c’est quelque chose que tous les guitaristes savent intuitivement !

Pour d’autres instruments, effectivement, je chercherai beaucoup plus …

And what about for a larger ensemble piece? For example, your French Concerto is for full modern symphony orchestra, which is a huge undertaking – do you use a midi/synthesiser package to work out the parts?

Lorsque je compose pour musique de chambre ou pour orchestre, pour ce qui est de la conception du conducteur, j’ai la chance d’avoir l’oreille absolue – je travaille sans avoir besoin d’un « retour son », le plus souvent à partir d’une ébauche que je note en style de « piano réduction ».

C’est, d’ailleurs, pour tout le monde, fabuleusement enrichissant et intéressant de cultiver son propre « son mental » : cela conserve une certaine jeunesse au cerveau !

En plus de finaliser l’édition elle-même du conducteur, je sors toujours moi-même les parties séparées. Depuis les débuts, j’utilise le logiciel à partir duquel j’enseignais aux étudiants en musicologie : Sibelius – je connais moins Finale, et je sais qu’il existe bien d’autres logiciels très performants …

L’avantage, lorsque l’on réalise toutes les étapes de l’édition, c’est la profondeur de la relecture : c’est le meilleur moyen d’éviter les fautes !

Ainsi, pour nous, musiciens, nous développons notre regard après avoir utilisé notre oreille !  

Do you often listen to music purely for pleasure (without analysis)? In your current mood as you answer this question, what would you like to listen to?

Étant à la campagne, j’adore le silence (et j’en éprouve intensément le besoin) – ou, plutôt, ce « silence de la vie » entrecoupé de chants d’oiseaux et de cris d’animaux. D’où, chaque fois que j’écoute, ce seront tous ces compositeurs qui auront, inlassablement, glorifié la Nature et la Vie et que j’adore tous !

Simplement, je ne mets jamais une musique comme « bruit de fond » - c’est quelque chose que je ne sais pas faire ! J’écoute vraiment ! Plongée dedans ! Ou, j’écoute le silence …

Johann Sebastian Bach reste le « Grand des grands », mais pas que lui, loin de là … Et Messiaen, Ohana, Boulez, Berio … offrent bien des extases !

Indépendamment de toute émotion, je pense que, dans tous les cas de figure, on peut, sans se lasser, écouter Johann Sebastian Bach …

Do you also listen to popular music/folk music/world music? If so what are your tastes in these?

J’aime beaucoup toutes les musiques traditionnelles : leur sincérité – parfois, leur innocence. J’aurai beaucoup travaillé autour desdites musiques traditionnelles, aussi bien pour des arrangements qu’en composition : ce sont elles qui alimentent, de leurs forces vives, ce qui deviendra, après complexification, de la musique « sérieuse » !

Et j’adore des traditions du monde entier – ma naissance au Maroc m’aura facilité la tâche, en me faisant côtoyer, d’emblée, plusieurs courants musicaux !

Même si le patrimoine de transmission orale reste passablement répétitif, les rythmes sont affirmés, francs, les tournures mélodiques percutantes, le phrasé plein de surprises … C’est un fonds auquel on peut puiser sans réserve !

Do you often return to your own compositions later, and re-listen to them or revise them?

Je peux tout à fait revenir sur des compositions et les revisiter, même si ce n’est pas le cas le plus fréquent, parce que je les travaille beaucoup.

Je l’ai fait, en particulier, pour l’œuvre pédagogique – dont j’essaie d’améliorer constamment les progressions et la diversité stylistique.

Pour les strictes œuvres, je pense que, telles elles sont parues, telles elles sont ! C’est très difficile de modifier une structure aboutie sans la rendre instable : à ce moment-là, cela deviendrait une autre œuvre !

If you were to choose one of your pieces to introduce a guitarist to your work, which one? And why?

C’est une question difficile, parce que j’aurai constamment été très sincère et qu’il y a plusieurs périodes, dans mes compositions – je ne sais pas s’il y a une œuvre qui les résume toutes.

Pour découvrir quelques résultats tendant vers l’ « hypertonalité », je citerai « Abacus », aux Éditions Reift ; « Tant l’Or des Nuits » et le « Concerto Français » (davantage modal et tonal), aux Éditions Bergmann, la « Quasi Sonata », aux Éditions Soldano, mais il y en a d’autres … 

Does your music have different audiences? For example, are your solo guitar pieces aimed at the same listener as, say, the Four Bagatelles (which I’m listening to as I write these questions - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dWGMQZafZmc )?

Comme en Littérature, en Musique, « par l’effort, la joie ! » (comme l’exprimait si bien Beethoven).

La Musique Sérieuse s’adresse absolument à tous les publics – comme la Grande Littérature.

 Même si son écoute demande un peu de réflexion et de concentration !

Personnellement, j’aime allier un minimum d’esprit populaire à un langage davantage complexe, ce qui touche à tous les aspects de l’âme et de la personnalité tout en intéressant toutes les oreilles.

Quant au point de départ de l’hypertonalité, c’était mon profond désir de rapprocher la musique contemporaine du grand public.

Il est évident, aussi, que, si l’on présente bien les œuvres, tout le monde peut y accéder : il reste certainement un gros travail de médiation culturelle à effectuer.

Can you pinpoint your main motivation in composing – for example, to delight or entertain? To work out a musical problem or theory? To express something personal?

La question est difficile. J’avais moins de quatre ans que je savais que j’écrirais et que j’écrirais autre chose que les livres que je voyais devant moi (je ne savais pas encore ce qu’était une partition de musique …).

Je pense que tous les êtres humains viennent sur Terre missionnés et que, l’essentiel, dans la vie, c’est de remplir sa mission …

Je peux aussi le résumer autrement. En dépit de nombreux autre engagements, dont professionnels et familiaux, je sais que toute ma vie tend vers la Musique.

D’où, je « cherche » (il y a encore beaucoup à découvrir en musique), tout comme je « ressens », essentiellement en musique.

You are often described as a very accomplished guitarist: do you perform in concert? If so, do you include your own compositions in your concert programmes?

J’ai commencé comme professeur et interprète en guitare, donnant de nombreux concerts. Puis, les événements en ont décidé autrement : il n’y avait alors pas de poste en guitare dans la région que j’habite depuis mon mariage et j’ai une hernie discale qui se sera remise à me taquiner …

D’où, j’aurai été contrainte d’approfondir encore mes études théoriques, me remettre très sérieusement au piano (que je délaissais un peu) et devenir chef de chœur …

Comme quoi les « coïncidences » de la vie savent très bien vous amener là où elle le veulent !

 Je me destinais au professorat et à l’interprétation en guitare : j’aurai, du coup, plus largement pénétré l’univers musical – chanté, enseigné musique et musicologie, composé pour la voix et de multiples instruments …

Do you make recordings of your compositions and arrangements? Are they available to listen to?

De nombreux interprètes travaillent sur mes œuvres en guitare (et nous travaillons ensemble virtuellement).

Je ne m’autorise pas à jouer publiquement depuis que la composition occupe la majorité de mes journées – j’aurai pris l’habitude d’interpréter en travaillant beaucoup … : là, le temps finit par me manquer !

Cela dit, je joue, chez moi, toutes les pièces que j’écris pour guitare.

Je peux vous citer plusieurs Youtube (liste non exhaustive) : « Invitation pour clarinette basse et guitare » https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVIP_43yZ5o ; « Landscape of the Daylight Moon » https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQqYfFOl9TQ ; « Variations sur La Folia »   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-vMxAMlJIKM      ; « Litanie A la Vierge Noire de Rocamadour » https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qhPj1BSvZdg ; « Quasi Sonata » https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5SQ8NaY9OZY ;     « Variations In Memoriam »  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFXb2uABgkA  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7uHRzjuO8o  …   ;    le CD « Œuvres Hypertonales pour guitare » https://play.anghami.com/song/40652809  …

Vous avez aussi, par exemple, mon Quintetto « La Maestria », dans un CD dédié aux compositrices d’aujourd’hui « The Other Half » : https://www.amazon.fr/Other-Half-Music-Colette-Mourey/dp/B07MWZ5NXX

Do you enjoy hearing your work performed by others?

C’est toujours une magnifique découverte que d’écouter l’œuvre interprétée par un artiste que l’on ne connaît pas : de façon inattendue, originale et personnelle – entre l’instrumentiste et le compositeur se forge, alors, comme une sorte d’ininterrompu dialogue !

L’aspect le plus intéressant, c’est qu’il revient au second tout autre chose que ce qu’il avait initialement « entendu » : à chaque fois, le résultat est de toute beauté et vraiment « bien vu » !

Nous ne devons pas oublier que, seule, une foisonnante diversité d’approches permettra à l’œuvre de « vivre » (et non mourir, figée).

Were you already composing before you started serious academic studies in music? If so, did your work change as a result of your study?

J’ai toujours écrit (certainement très malhabilement dans mon enfance).

Bien sûr, les études s’avèrent absolument indispensables à qui veut composer ! Nous ne faisons que déduire d’une culture préexistante …

Pourtant, je ne pense pas avoir changé de style à cause des connaissances qui m’auront été proposées.

L’étude théorique permet de valablement justifier son langage, de mieux l’analyser, de rationnellement le complexifier : mais, on reconnaît toujours l’idée ou le style initiaux – une Pensée finalement déjà très aboutie, qui préexiste à la scolarité. 

Does the work of other contemporary composers influence you?

Je continue à m’émerveiller devant Boulez, Berio, Aperghis, et bien d’autres …. Heureusement, la musique vit, se transforme, évolue, prend des couleurs inédites … Rien n’est définitivement fixé dans l’Art !

Je ne sais pas si l’on peut parler d’influence directe, mais tous les contacts que l’on entretient entre compositeurs, tous les concerts auxquels on assiste, permettent d’enrichir son propre style, donnent des idées nouvelles, provoquent le dépassement de soi …

Would you say you are, or have been, part of any particular movement in music?

A priori, je n’ai jamais fait partie d’aucun mouvement musical institué ; j’aurai juste inventé et tenté de développer mon système, l’ « hypertonalité » - qui gagnera à être repris par d’autres et encore transformé …

Is there any performer you would particularly wish to write a piece of music for?

J’ai écrit pour de nombreux guitaristes et je serai toujours ravie d’écrire pour qui s’intéresse à l’hypertonalité et souhaite la découvrir au travers d’une nouvelle pièce – c’est quelque chose que je fais bénévolement, dans l’idée que ce soit accessible à tout le monde.

Effectivement, je rêve d’écrire encore pour quelques grands interprètes auxquels je n’ai jusqu’ici rien confié : cela finira par se réaliser !

I’ve mentioned the amazing amount and variety of work you do – teaching, academic writing, composition and creative writing. I see that your novels have all been published fairly recently, and in a very short space of time. Currently, which of these activities is your main focus? And which would be the last of these you could possibly give up?

J’ai majoritairement édité (composé ou écrit) après avoir élevé mes enfants, auxquels j’aurai, très normalement, consacré une vingtaine d’années de ma vie. J’aurai attendu, donc, de retrouver un minimum de liberté !

Depuis que je suis à la retraite, je peux me consacrer entièrement à mon œuvre.

 Cela dit, dans l’ensemble, celle-ci est antérieure – je brouillonnais, durant mes années professionnellement et familialement occupées, en attendant d’avoir le temps de finaliser : ce que je réalise actuellement.

Je suis certainement une « compositrice et guitariste » professionnelle.

Mes Essais témoignent d’une Pensée philosophique qui me tient à cœur et que j’illustre aussi par mes romans (plus faciles à lire).

A priori, tout ceci constitue une seule et même démarche, qui revêt différentes facettes.

Mais, professionnellement, donc, je ne revendique que l’aspect musical !

Do you see a connection between your fiction writing and music composition?

La musique est un peu comme une « philosophie sans mots » : elle s’adresse directement à l’âme et, en fin de compte, c’est elle, la véritable « philosophie de vie » !

Cependant, le compositeur navigue aisément du « motif » (musical) au « mot » (littéraire) et les combine, par exemple, dans son œuvre vocale : il n’existe pas de franche séparation !

What are you working on musically at the moment?

En ce moment, je mets la dernière main à mes « Études Progressives » pour guitare – que je confierai aux Éditions Bergmann, tout en achevant « Cube » pour piano (une série de pièces, dont certaines déjà parues, sur les Solides Platoniciens), poursuivant ma Symphonie « L’Univers », en même temps que plusieurs Concertos et un Trio « des Algorithmes » …

Toutes ces œuvres finissent par se travailler l’une par l’autre – et toutes par mes écrits et vice versa : ce qui évite – du moins je l’espère ! d’être trop « instrumentiste » plutôt que « musicienne », en conservant, ainsi, une vision large !

How has your working life been affected by the pandemic? And how, if at all, has it affected your composing?

Depuis les débuts de cette tragique pandémie, nous vivons, comme tout le monde, davantage « reclus » !

Cela dit, la solitude s’avère très propice à la composition et, de façon inexpectée, me donne le temps d’écrire notamment pour orchestre et, en général, de façon plus longue et plus complexe …

 Peut-être vivons-nous, tous, une fructueuse période d’introspection, dont je souhaite que l’humanité ressorte davantage responsable : écologiquement et humainement.

You live and work in a beautiful part of France – do you feel your surroundings influence your music?

La Nature est le meilleur des professeurs ! J’ai, effectivement, la chance inouïe de vivre à la campagne, ce à quoi je ne renoncerais pour rien au monde ! Quand tout semble vous abandonner, vous écoutez les oiseaux, et la Vie vous insuffle de ne jamais vous décourager …

Do you have one burning ambition, in terms of composing music (that is, to compose a particular thing)?

J’ai écrit des Cantates pour chœur et orchestre et un Ballet (notamment aux Éditions Reift), mais j’espère aller jusqu’à l’Opéra et l’Opérette - certainement en y incluant de la guitare, en ce dernier cas. Pourquoi pas sur la Comédie que je viens d’éditer (ou autre) : « Tout l’Or du Ciel » https://www.amazon.com/Tout-lOr-Ciel-Com%C3%A9die-French/dp/B094TG1SY5/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=

J’espère, aussi, continuer à rédiger des chœurs d’enfants : la polyphonie vocale développe tellement l’intelligence que l’on n’en aura jamais assez ! De plus, combiner patrimoine traditionnel et musique sérieuse permet de développer un outil d’éducation hors pair !

Enfin, il me reste plein d’idées pour la guitare et pour le piano, que je souhaite concrétiser …

Has any teacher, mentor or musical collaborator specially influenced the direction your music has taken? If so, who and how?

En général, les éditeurs aident beaucoup au développement de la pensée de leurs compositeurs. Pour ma part, cela aura été le cas avec l’éditeur et chef d’orchestre Marc Reift. Le compositeur reste lui-même, bien sûr (au grand dam de son éditeur !) mais, de relecture en relecture, finira par approfondir sa propre pensée.

Sinon, j’aime la Musique Sérieuse de façon très large : l’ensemble des compositeurs … Et j’écoute beaucoup. D’où, c’est cet immense courant de Pensée qui m’aura éclairée, plus qu’un nom en particulier.

You were born in Morocco – do you think you absorbed any of its musical influences?

Il est évident que, de parents français très mélomanes et férus de « grande musique », étant née au Maroc et y ayant passé ma petite enfance, je ne pouvais qu’être, d’emblée, polyculturelle et bicontinentale ! Notamment du point de vue des échelles musicales …

J’ai un pays « de cœur » en plus de ma patrie ! Généralement, j’aurai combiné les deux …

Am I wrong in seeing an influence of spirituality or even mysticism in some of your musical output?

Je suis très certainement mystique – a priori, d’ailleurs, tout être humain est, à sa propre façon, mystique !

Nous pouvons tous, très nettement, percevoir ce blanc faisceau énergétique lumineux qui nous relie, tout à fait personnellement, à notre Être Supérieur …

À partir de là, c’est toujours dommage de fixer, irrémédiablement, un dogme : on a tout à y perdre !

De fait, tout, du microcosme au macrocosme, s’architecture, merveilleusement, comme une « Intelligence combinée à de l’Amour » : une « Impersonnelle Conscience Multiverselle », que le moindre atome et chaque galaxie reflètent !

Un « Dieu » simultanément immanent et transcendant, qui se manifeste tout le temps et partout …

Technology – how do you use it in your music?

Même si j’ai utilisé une ou deux fois le synthétiseur, je préfère largement les sons humains : l’interprète est toujours plus intelligent et témoigne de beaucoup plus de goût qu’une machine !

Je me souviens, surtout, avoir marié des sons de guitare à des sons synthétiques : cela me semble possible, dans la mesure où la guitare est un instrument riche, attachant et expressif. Mais, pour l’accompagner, je préfère, de beaucoup, un orchestre en chair et en os !

[1] Interviewer’s note – in French, the term “chef de choeur” is more or less gender neutral.  In English, there seems to be no satisfactory word for a female choirmaster – ‘choirmistress’ just doesn’t work.  I apologise unreservedly for the sexism of my native tongue.



Older Post


Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published